Dealing with Death as an Atheist and Processing Grief

A video is making the rounds on YouTube about how atheists should deal with the topic of death. Its by two YouTubers Stephen Woodford and Rachel Oates. I want to use this blog to promote it and use it for discussion. 

“Death never takes a wise man by surprise; he is always ready to go.”

Jean de la Fontaine     

“I would rather die a meaningful death than to live a meaningless life.”

Corazon Aquino     

There is a fascinating atheist video that is making the rounds on YouTube. Its by Stephen Woodford and Rachel Oates. The video is about how atheists and non religious people deal with the topic of death. Years ago in my faith crisis when I pushed back from Christianity I had an interesting conversation with an atheist here in Washington, D.C. He explained to me that life is short and we are to enjoy life. The fact that we are going to die should free us to enjoy life more. This life should be much more meaningful and that atheists appreciate life much more than Christians. Honestly I could see what he is saying. I watched this video and and wanted to promote it and get it preserved on this blog. If you are atheist or secular humanist, give this video a watch. Feel free to discuss it below as there is a lot to consider in this video. That is it guys please take care. 

 

4 thoughts on “Dealing with Death as an Atheist and Processing Grief

  1. Very good video.

    I’ve heard a good analogy – if you are at a party, and you spend the entire time being sad that the party will eventually be over, you miss out on all the fun of the party.

    And I also feel that death is the price we pay for birth. If nobody ever died, we wouldn’t need replacement people, and would have no need for children. I miss my dad horribly, but the fact that people die also means that I was able to give birth to two wonderful daughters and help them grow up. And I see his legacy in them every day. (They both got his artistic talent.)

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    • I’ve heard a good analogy – if you are at a party, and you spend the entire time being sad that the party will eventually be over, you miss out on all the fun of the party.

      Problem is, Ubi-Dubi, what if that is your default state?
      One of the reasons I’ve always had a problem getting motivated for anything is while everyone else sees the moment, I default to such a long view I see whatever I do going into the dumpster after my death or deteriorating and decaying over the next couple centuries. Sort of a generic “It’s all gonna burn” by way of Ecclesiasticus.

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      • I too have had a similar thought. I try to remember that I was not suffering any inconveniences before I was born, and thankfully it seems probable after death. I find it a shame that so many of us spend a whole lifetime in existence worrying about not existing, despite not existing for billions of years before that. Thinking of this state of non-sufferings relaxes me enough to not think about death too much.
        Also, how many religious people cry at funerals? I’ve never been to a ‘happy’ religious funeral. I am rather convinced that atheists suffer after a loss no more than any religious person. We all mourn equally, which to me says a lot about a theists genuine views of the afterlife.

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