A Look at Mark Dever’s Newest Book – Discipling: How to Help Others Follow Jesus

A look at the newest book by Mark Dever called “Discipling: How to Help Others Follow Jesus.” This looks at the problems contained in one chapter summary that was published at The Gospel Coalition. Mark Dever’s newest work has some deep concerns. I read this chapter and reflected on it in the context of issues in Capitol Hill Baptist Church and also the ongoing issues between Mark Dever and embattled C.J. Mahaney. I hope this will give people pause before they purchase this book from Crossway or elsewhere. 

“Seeing reality for what it is is what we call discernment. The work of discernment is very hard.”

Lewis B Smedes 

“We need discernment in what we see and what we hear and what we believe.”

Charles Swindoll. 

“Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?”

37 Jesus replied: “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’[a] 38 This is the first and greatest commandment. 39 And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’[b] 40 All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.

Matthew 22:36-40 NIV 

The Reformed Industrial Complex is a pillar of the Neo-Calvinist movement. Books and conferences are the driving factor in the movement. The main publisher in this movement I believe is Crossway. Mark Dever recently came out with a new book called “Discipling: How to Help Others Follow Jesus.” Mark Dever is the Senior Pastor of Capitol Hill Baptist Church and he is one of the chief enablers of C.J. Mahaney. Today’s response comes from a recent post from The Gospel Coalition. This is a summary from chapter 10 of Dever’s new book. The tile of the article is called “9 Ways to Raise Up Leaders in Your Church.” When I read Mark Dever’s contribution  in light of all the issues and problems both within 9 Marks, as well as Sovereign Grace I felt that this needed a response. What I am going to do is comment below, but my comments will be in red

The New Testament is filled with instruction on discipling believers generally. But now and then it also focuses on raising up church leaders in particular. For instance, Paul tells Titus, “This is why I left you in Crete, so that you might put what remained into order and appoint elders in every town as I directed you” (Titus 1:5). Then he describes what these elders should be like. Similarly, he tells Timothy to find “faithful men who will be able to teach others also” (2 Tim. 2:2). 

In the same way, I’d like to offer counsel on how I’ve personally worked to find, encourage, and raise up other leaders in my church, whether to serve in my church or eventually in other churches. Many of the matters discussed below apply to discipling more broadly. After all, the criteria listed for an elder in Titus 1and 1 Timothy 3 should characterize every Christian, with the exception of not being a recent convert and being able to teach. Which is to say, the goals of discipling a believer and a would-be church leader are mostly the same. 

This seems wise however how has it been applied? Has what Mark Dever written applied to life inside Capitol Hill Baptist Church? As we shall we what Mark Dever teaches and actually practices are going to be two separate issues. This is what makes many parts of the Neo-Calvinist movement toxic. This is ground zero for 9 Marks and its the model that is franchised into other churches. 

Still, I do want to lay the onus on elders especially to think about how to raise up future leaders. That is one of your particular obligations. Samuel Miller (1769–1850) once observed:

Wherever you reside, endeavor always to acquire and maintain an influence with young men. They are the hope of the church and of the state; and he who becomes instrumental in imbuing their minds with sentiments of wisdom, virtue, and piety is one of the greatest benefactors of his species. They are, therefore, worthy of your special and unwearied attention. . . . In short, employ every Christian method of attaching them to your person and ministry, and of inducing them to take an early interest in the affairs of the church.

Here then are nine steps for raising up leaders in your church.

1. Shepherd Toward Biblical Qualifications

The place to begin is with the qualifications Paul gives to Timothy and Titus:

If anyone aspires to the office of overseer, he desires a noble task. Therefore an overseer must be above reproach, the husband of one wife, sober-minded, self-controlled, respectable, hospitable, able to teach, not a drunkard, not violent but gentle, not quarrelsome, not a lover of money. He must manage his own household well, with all dignity keeping his children submissive, for if someone does not know how to manage his own household, how will he care for God’s church? He must not be a recent convert, or he may become puffed up with conceit and fall into the condemnation of the devil. Moreover, he must be well thought of by outsiders, so that he may not fall into disgrace, into a snare of the devil. (1 Tim. 3:1–7; also Titus 1:6–9)

There’s nothing extraordinary about these virtues. But as I heard Don Carson once say, an elder does what an ordinary Christian should do extraordinarily well. He’s a model for the whole flock. He’s a picture of maturity for all.

That verse from 1 Timothy 3:1-7 and Titus 1:6-9 is pretty damning when you think of many of the Neo-Calvinist leaders. Did it apply to Mark Driscoll when he led Mars Hill Seattle? How does someone who is of sober mind and respectable teach that women are penis homes and that a repentant woman gets down on her knees and gives her husband a blow job? What about C.J. Mahaney and his ongoing allegations of covering up child sex abuse? Is that respectable? When the results of your decisions are flooding the local media with negative press coverage then what does that say? What about self control and sober mind. When C.J. Mahaney made Carolyn Mahaney have sex after she was dealing with morning sickness due to pregnancy how does that work? It also says that he must not be a lover of money, well when C.J. Mahaney is throwing around money to corrupt people what does that say? What about Mark Dever? When C.J. Mahaney is allegedly corrupting Mark Dever with money what does that say? After all it must be remembered that people who are being corrupted sometimes do not know that they are being corrupted. 

I’ll occasionally ask young men whether they’ve thought about serving as an elder, and I’ll do that early on in their discipleship, knowing they may be years away from being qualified and ready. It’s my way of asking whether serving and building up the church is one of their ambitions, and if not, why not? Which is to say, a good discipling tool for every Christian is this list (with the exception of able to teach).

What Mark Dever is getting at in this section is the following question. Who drinks Kool Aid and who will blindly follow orders? This is about the creation of “The True Believer” as Eric Hoffer once wrote about. Mark is trying to find the people that will follow, don’t question, and can be loyal pit bulls faithful to the very end. He needs to do that especially in a polity program that enforces church over individual. 

I want to lay the onus on elders especially to think about how to raise up future leaders. That is one of your particular obligations.

That said, I don’t believe Paul means to provide an exhaustive list for what an elder should be. For instance, he never says “faithful Bible reader” or “man of prayer,” though I think every elder should be those two things. When it comes to raising up leaders generally, and men whom the church would financially support especially, I do think we should also look for natural gifts of leadership. I want to promote and equip men who look like they can help advance Christianity into the place I’ll never go: the future beyond my passing.

Christianity, especially evangelical Christianity is in a pretty sick and toxic place as it is. In order to advance Christianity and make it better what some people will need to do is state that they have screwed up. That they have created a system, that I would categorically state that is opposed to much of what Jesus stood for. 

Does this mean I’m transgressing James 2:1 and playing favorites? I don’t think so. James is concerned with wrongly favoring the rich. But wrong discernment and discrimination doesn’t make all distinctions wrong. Remember, Paul tells Timothy to look for “faithful men” who can “teach others,” as well as men who “aspire to the office of overseer.” A man can aspire for the wrong reasons, but a man who doesn’t aspire at all is not qualified.

Ultimately, you want to shepherd men toward biblical qualified-ness. That’s the baseline. And the more a man also demonstrates the natural giftings, which show themselves in the fact that people follow him, the more you might look for opportunities to have him practice leading.

2. Adopt a Posture of Looking

If you want to raise up leaders, you need to be on permanent lookout for them. This should be your posture, especially if you’re an elder. Sydney Anglican Phillip Jensen refers to “blokes worth watching.” Can you name any BWWs around you?

Pastors should be profoundly opportunistic about raising up more pastors. And the whole church should have a deep confidence that the Lord wants new leaders raised up.

I want to promote and equip men who look like they can help advance Christianity into the place I’ll never go: the future beyond my passing.

I keep my eyes open in a number of ways. I hang around the congregation and interact with them. I stand at the door after Sunday services and notice who says what, or who is interacting with whom. I work to provide lots of teaching opportunities in the weekly life of our church where gifted teachers can emerge. Praying daily through the church’s membership directory also brings people to mind.

In this section Mark Dever is talking about looking for people who tow the line and follow the party line at any and all costs. “Blokes worth watching” in a 9 Marks world is someone who adheres to the state at any and all costs. Looking for more pastors means that Mark is looking for people who will control the beast that he has given birth to. It was like this in the Communist Party or Nazi movements, party leaders were taught and trained to look for prospects who could lead the party. Mark Dever is doing the exact same thing. Man…who ever thought that studying totalitarian regimes in grad schol would help me unpack and study 9 Marks, Mark Dever and Capitol Hill Baptist Church? One other thing to also note…this is about weeding out the weak and practicing social Darwinism in its purest form. A form ordained by God, especially in the Neo-Calvinist construct. 

3. Spend Personal Time

Spending time with people is a crucial part of raising up leaders, just as Jesus called the disciples to join him on the mountain so they might “be with him.”

Sadly, I see many pastors build walls around themselves. Those aren’t men who will be raising up more leaders, at least directly. I’m not saying you need to be an extrovert, but a pastor does need to find some way to spend time with other potential leaders in his church. Hebrews 13 exhorts the church to follow their elders’ example. How can they do that if they don’t know their leaders up close? Paul’s call to imitation requires the same—time spent.

So a pastor needs to figure out ways to spend time with younger men. Lunches can be crucial. On those occasions when my wife asks me to go the grocery store, I typically break into a cold sweat for fear of getting the wrong thing (my issue, not hers!), and so I often bring a brother with me. That way, we can spend intentional time together, and he can share the blame. I build people into my sermon preparation schedule, too, including a lunch devoted to brainstorming over application and a Saturday night reading preview. Not only do these encounters improve the sermon, but I’m also able to get a sense of different folks, and encourage them.

All these examples are designed around me, my work, and my schedule. Figure out what schedule works for you, and draw disciples into it.

Not a lot I disagree on here. One thing I would add, is spend time with people outside your tribe and clan. You will learn much more than you do in hanging around with those in house. 

4. Advance Trust

If you wish to see leaders raised up, your general posture should be characterized by a willingness to advance trust. Having lived in different places and traveled, I know such a disposition varies from place to place. But I do think it’s a property of love: love believes all things and hopes all things (1 Cor. 13:7). You probably have members of your church whom the Lord has entrusted with great talent. But for that to be discovered, someone must advance trust to them, like credit. And good leaders do this. They don’t wait for people to prove themselves, and then give them teaching opportunities. No, they see the hint of something that, with a little encouragement, could grow and flourish. So they advance credit and let the young disciple spend it.

If you want to see leaders raised up, your general posture should be characterized by a willingness to advance trust.

Many leaders, with the best of motives, can be too conservative here. More than once I’ve seen senior pastors unable to affirm anyone else’s leadership. Or I’ve witnessed men become lay elders and then pull the treehouse rope ladder up after them, so that no one else can get in, asking more of prospective elders than anyone ever asked of them! Now, you will make mistakes. You won’t bat a thousand. I haven’t. But I do definitely take risks in leadership. It’s worth it. God is sovereign. Christ will build his church. So let’s lean in and take some risks.

Congregations, for their part, need to be patient with young men in leadership as they make young-man mistakes. I often tell churches not to be afraid of nominating a young lion cub. He may scratch the floors or damage some furniture, but if you’re patient with him, you’ll have a lion who loves you for life. 

Trust is already choked out of the 9 Marks system. After all trust was lost in how Mark Dever fumbled the football. Remember the New York Buffalo Bills? They were remembered for losing four Super Bowls back to back in 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. Mark Dever has lost trust by how he conducted himself with the C.J. Mahaney/SGM mess. But in addition Dever talks about love, yet he has redefined love as well. Love does not exist in the 9 Marks construct. Brutally disciplining in a totalitarian manner is not love. It is not love when your actions cause people pain and force them to question where they are at in their life. Love builds up it does not tear down. 

5. Delegate Responsibility

This point is tied to the last one. How do you advance trust? By delegating responsibility and opportunity. There are several components to this:

Give people the opportunity to lead.

Quietly keep a list of men in your congregation you think might be good teachers, or public pray-ers, or service leaders, or Sunday school teachers. Test them by delegating. Again, I recognize some pastors feel very protective about their flocks: “But Mark, the Holy Spirit has made me the overseer.” That’s where I say: When you die, friend, the church is going to be fine. And you want to help make it more fine by loosening your grip now and preparing other leaders by delegating. Your goal is not to build your kingdom. Your goal is to empower others by giving them opportunities to lead and teach.

Lose votes and arguments.

Delegating authority means ceding a measure of control. And if you’re willing to do that, you need to be willing to lose votes or not always have the last word. Not everything must go your way. If you never let people lead in a way contrary to your own opinion, you’re not really letting them lead! So, yes, you might be disappointed to lose on this or that issue, but the gain of encouraging other leaders to lead is a better long-term investment (not to mention it blesses the church with the gifts of their wisdom).

Cultivate respect for other leaders.

Some years ago, our assistant pastor and I were standing on the platform at the front of the church before a Bible study started. He was about to lead it. In the midst of talking playfully with each other, I patted him on the head (he’s shorter than I am). He immediately took me aside and said, kindly but firmly, “Mark, stop it. You can’t treat me like that in front of the congregation if you want them to respect me.” Once he said it, it seemed so obvious. Of course! I needed to publicly treat him like a leader and work to cultivate that respect for him in the congregation.

This part just comes to show that Mark Dever is living in his own little world. Does what he write in this section apply to Capitol Hill Baptist? I have actually heard from a couple of people over the years that people can’t ask a number of questions or raise issues in the church. I find it interesting that he makes references to the Holy Spirit. Much of Neo-Calvinism lacks the Holy Spirit I would suggest. In addition the programs and formulas that some of these Neo-Calvinist churches employ really prevent the Holy Spirit from being able to work or do much of anything. Reading about Mark saying that not everything “has to go your way” is a riot. In Capitol Hill Baptist everything has to go Mark’s way. Its his show and the way he functions. 

6. Give and Receive Feedback

Once you delegate responsibilities and opportunities to minister, you also need to create structures for feedback. For starters, that means showing those you’re discipling how to give and receive godly criticism. Be honest and tender with brothers about things they could improve on.

Your ability to give godly criticism will be greatly enhanced by modeling what it means to invite and receive godly criticism. To encourage that, I try to receive critical comments without answering back (not that I always succeed), even if I disagree with the criticism. I do answer if I think the comment will mislead others, but if I slap down every constructive criticism a younger man offers me, especially after I’ve invited the feedback, he’ll quickly learn it’s futile (and embarrassing) for him to offer forthright opinions to me. And that will prove the least useful for me! There’s always room for improvement in my ministry. The feedback I’ve received over 20 years has greatly helped me to serve the church better.

In addition to modeling what it means to give and receive godly criticism, we must also model giving godlyencouragement. Paul had plenty of critical things to say to the Corinthian church, yet he opens the letter by thanking God for them (1 Cor. 1:5, 7). I don’t think that Paul was flattering the Corinthians. I think he was rightly acknowledging what God had done. Should we not acknowledge that what comes from God belongs to God, like the evidences of grace in one another’s lives? Encouraging would-be leaders should teach them to give praise to God.

So many times I’ve seen men, particularly younger guys, act as if real leadership is shown in correcting others. That’s why young men’s sermons often scold. What they haven’t figured out is that you can often accomplish more by encouragement. There are times to scold. But 80 to 90 percent of what you hope to correct can be accomplished through encouragement. If you look back at your life and consider who influenced you the most, you’ll probably realize it’s the people who believed in you. As Henry Drummond once observed, “You will find, if you think for a moment, that the people who influence you are people who believe in you. In an atmosphere of suspicion men shrivel up; but in that atmosphere they expand, and find encouragement and educative fellowship.”

So many times I’ve seen men, particularly younger guys, act as if real leadership is shown in correcting others. That’s why young men’s sermons often scold. What they haven’t figured out is that you can often accomplish more by encouragement.

When I observe that the men I’m discipling give encouragement and criticism to me or to one another, I learn as much about them as I do about the thing they’re commenting on. It’s like standing in an art gallery and looking not at the paintings, but at the people observing the paintings. What are they drawn to? What do they emphasize? Setting up good feedback loops, if you’re a pastor, helps all of this discipling to happen.

This point had me on the floor after what I have heard about how Mark Dever operates and the culture at Capitol Hill Baptist. In an authorterian culture are you free to give feedback? You are expected to receive feedback and take it, but that is about it. By the way can Mark Dever take criticism? If so why does he block people left and right on Twitter. I have yet to really block someone on Twitter, to the best of my ability I did block a couple of bots that were spamming me with advertisements. But I have been challenged on Twitter and I am fine with it. But Mark Dever is not someone who is open to being challenged. So to read him advise that is just incredible! Where does this stuff come from? But the concept of Mark Dever receiving criticism I would suggest is not true. I believe Mark likes to surround himself with a lot of yes men. That is key to remember here. 

Its true that you can encourage more people by encouragement. I agree with him there. That is just a reality of life. We all need encouragement, and the encouragement people need should be genuine. It should not have strings attached. 

 

7. Encourage Godly Authority

Too often today, people don’t understand what a gift godly authority can be. Raising up leaders requires us to teach about godly authority, and to encourage it. Jesus certainly taught his disciples about good use of authority (Matt. 20:25–27).

The fallen world both misuses authority and lies about authority well used. Satan’s basic lie to Adam and Eve was that God couldn’t really love them and tell them no.

The true nature of authority became clear to me years ago when I was preaching through 2 Samuel. David’s “last words” are striking:

When one rules justly over men, ruling in the fear of God, he dawns on them like the morning light, like the sun shining forth on a cloudless morning, like rain that makes grass to sprout from the earth. (2 Sam. 23:3–4)

Good authority blesses those under it. It nourishes them. People will gravitate toward healthy authority that spends itself for the good of those under its care, rather than using them for its own good. Look at how a family prospers under good parents, or a team under a good coach.

The abuse of authority by pastors is such a terribly destructive and uniquely blasphemous sin. 

That’s why the abuse of authority by pastors is such a terribly destructive and uniquely blasphemous sin. Further, the stories of prosperity preachers buying private jets for tens of millions of dollars point to something incredibly twisted and Satanic. Such “pastors” reinforce the lie that Satan hissed into Adam and Eve’s ear in Eden: that authority is just a way to abuse you for the leader’s benefit.

Gratefully, the King on the cross shows us that the opposite is true for godly authority.

Just as Jesus tutored his disciples in the godly use of authority, and modeled it himself, so must we with any men we’re raising up in leadership. 

Mark Dever seems to believe that the world can misuse authority. When is Mark going to realize that the church can also misuse their authority as well? When is Mark going to come around to look at the problems with 9 Marks? After all Jesus said that the greatest commandment is to love the Lord with all your heart, soul, mind and strength. Then you love your neighbor as yourself. 9 Marks goes against scripture in this one area, as love is not even mentioned. That is a major problem and its why the system should be kicked into the ditch and abandoned. But to also read Mark Dever’s comments on abuse by authority and know his role in the SGM debacle and the C.J. Mahaney mess begs the question. Does Mark Dever get it? Or is he living in his own world? Or does he believe that 9 Marks can’t be abused or flawed. I mean a couple of numbers up above Mark said to give and receive feedback. Well this is my feedback to Mark Dever. 

8. Expect Clarity

Leaders in the church must know how to be unusually clear on doctrine and in teaching the truth generally. This is an implication of what Paul teaches the Ephesian leaders in Acts 20. And it’s his assumption throughout his letters to Timothy and Titus. 

A leader must possess a clear-headedness about the truth. You want people who have a natural ability to answer the question, “Why?” And they need to be especially clear about certain issues: the most basic matters of theology and the gospel; those doctrines that distinguish your church from others; and those teachings in Scripture that are under fire and unpopular in the world at large.

I got news for you Mark, Google tells me that you are now 56. If you haven’t learned this by now you will never learn. There are many questions and issues that will never be answered in a why format. There are many issues that are too complex, and hard that require people to wrestle with them. And also keep in mind that Mark Dever is also about advancing Neo-Calvinism so when he says the teachings in scripture are under fire what he needs to remember is that it is his brand of Neo-Calvinism that is under attack. His narrow view of the world is going to be Mark Dever’s downfall. 

9. Foster a Culture of Humility

What all eight of these previous practices require is a culture of humility. Christian discipling depends on such humility, which drives out envy.

It’s no sign of humility in me if I’m watching someone else minister and thinking either “I could do it better” or, feeling discouraged, “I could never do it that well.” God does different good things with different people. We’re like different instruments in the orchestra, and a good leader helps each person find his or her place. Why would the trombone be jealous of the kettledrum? Each can be enjoyed for what it is.

One way to view my whole ministry is getting my church ready for the next pastor.

Fostering a culture of humility means working against the fear of man. And we do that, of course, by learning to fear the Lord. Before men attend my church’s pastoral internship, we ask them to read Ed Welch’s When People Are Big and God Is Small. If you do not know that book, I highly commend it. Every would-be leader should learn to recognize fear of man in himself. One way we can see it in a new intern is when he shows up in our church and is threatened by other strong leaders. But I want strong leaders, as many as I can get. After all, one way to view my whole ministry is getting my church ready for the next pastor.

In general, humility leads us to speak when we should speak and stay silent when we should stay silent. It leads us to be both tender-hearted and thick-skinned. I want to see God’s church prosper by seeing more humble leaders raised up. And I think my humility is part of how that will happen.

What a joy to be used by God to disciple others! Why wouldn’t you spend your life doing this?

Nope…I think Mark needs to realize that humility is admitting error and saying that he is wrong. Will and can Mark Dever admit that his 9 Marks program is flawed? Will and can Mark Dever admit his errors in regards to C.J. Mahaney and SGM? Will and can Mark Dever admit his follies and gospel haven’t been so much as about honoring God but about advancing his brand of Calvinism? If you want to be a strong leader you admit mistakes. Humility is key to leadership. While I do not look too favorable on Ed Welch at least Mark Dever isn’t promoting C.J. Mahaney’s book on humility. That is a start. But stop and consider what Mark Dever has written in light of all his problems and issues with both humility and C.J. Mahaney. I find this part damning. 


The goal of this post is to get people to think. To question, and ask. Mark Dever by his nature wants a lot of yes men. People who follow without asking questions. The Lord has given people in the 9 Marks system a brain. I would suggest that not using it is not only a waste of talent, but also quite sinful. One should always poke questions and ask away. To not ask is to be foolish. To learn of the problems of 9 Marks and still go back into that system is no different than the Israelite who after breaking out of slavery wanted to go back to Egypt. Lets avoid Egypt people, lets avoid Capitol Hill Baptist and many other 9 Marks churches. That’s it for the day guys, I love you. 

9 thoughts on “A Look at Mark Dever’s Newest Book – Discipling: How to Help Others Follow Jesus

  1. I guess us women should be happy that we’re not included as potential leader fodder.

    If women are involved in a 9 Marks outfit, they should vote with their feet and their pocketbooks and GET OUT.

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  2. I actually just took a look inside the book (thanks to Amazon’s “Look Inside” function) and a search showed me that there are 10 instances of the word “woman/women” as versus 33 instances of the word “man/men”.

    But seriously, I don’t want to be discipled by these guys, not on your life.

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    • “Discipled” was a favorite term of that Shepherding Cult I was mixed up with in the Seventies.

      They claimed you were fully Discipled(TM) and filled with the Holy Spirit when you “popped” — you remember, the “snapping” phenomenon in forced indoctrination/brainwashing? Like 6079 Smith W experienced in Room 101, after which there is only “He Loved Big Brother”?

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  3. The goal of this post is to get people to think. To question, and ask. Mark Dever by his nature wants a lot of yes men. People who follow without asking questions.

    “Questions beget Thinking.
    Thinking begets Doubt.
    Doubt begets Heresy.
    Heresy must be Dealt With.
    Blessed is the mind too small for Doubt.”
    — Warhammer 40K (which coined the terms “GrimDark” and “Crapsack”)

    No matter how much Pious Christianese you put around it.

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  4. In order to follow Jesus, I just can’t be a Mensch (Yiddish for good person) and not do the kinds of things to others that I wouldn’t want done to me?

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Rather than compare Mr. Dever’s admonitions with his actual behavior — something I’m loathe to do as judgment belongs to the Lord — I prefer to simply look at his missive on its own merits.

    First, let’s review how to “raise up leaders”:

    “Wherever you reside,*endeavor* *always* to *acquire* and *maintain* an *influence* with young *men*.” [emphasis added]
    […]
    1. Shepherd Toward Biblical Qualifications (we all know what those are)
    2. Adopt a Posture of Looking (be on the lookout!)
    3. Spend Personal Time (do lunch)
    4. Advance Trust (great “leaders” do this)
    5. Delegate Responsibility (cultivate “respect”)
    6. Give and Receive Feedback (“Godly criticism”)
    7. Encourage Godly Authority (it’s always about “authority” with these guys, always, always)
    8. Expect Clarity (be clear on “doctrine” & “truth”)
    9. Foster a Culture of Humility (know when to stay silent)

    Not once in what I read is the first real biblical requirement mentioned:

    Being a *servant*.

    Somebody ought to show Mr. Dever the passage where Jesus washes the feet of the disciples during The Last Supper, just before they embark on their final earthly destination together to The Garden of Gethsemane.

    That is real biblical leadership.

    The concept of a SERVANT-leader, rather than being all about “authority” & “truth” & “doctrine” & “respect” & “Godly criticism” & “doing lunch” & “being on the lookout” & “knowing when to stay silent” & “endeavor” & “acquire” & “maintain” & “influence” and all that other self-help-psycho-babble “leadership” nonsense, is sadly and tragically lost on Mr. Dever & his sycophants.

    The best leaders have always been *servants* first and foremost.
    It really is that simple.
    Mr. Dever whiffs completely, and misses the mark.
    All 9 “marks”, in fact (though he does get around to “humility” by the 9th one), with no mention about being a servant, other than, “I’d like to offer counsel on how I’ve personally worked to find, encourage, and raise up other leaders in my church, whether to serve in my church or eventually in other churches.”

    And the word “serve” in this context is merely lip-service.

    Another “mark” of a good *biblical* leader is *prayer*, or put another way, a RELIANCE ON GOD. The best leaders in the bible modeled a reliance on God, none more than Jesus, who often “went up on a mountain to pray”, which is something we tend to skip over while focusing on all his miracles. All the other best leaders modeled this from Joseph, to Moses to Samuel, to David, etc. Perhaps Mr. Dever should familiarize himself with many of the Psalms that David wrote that display his reliance on God for all things.

    Here is the only mention Mr. Dever makes about “prayer” in this missive, in part 1 about “biblical qualifications”:

    “That said, I don’t believe Paul means to provide an exhaustive list for what an elder should be. For instance, he never says “faithful Bible reader” or “man of prayer,” though I think every elder should be those two things.”

    Oy vey.

    This is all “reliance-on-self” stuff.
    There is no mention of relying on God, in prayer.

    The bible has a lot to say about being a servant, a disciple, a follower of Christ, about being faithful, about relying on the Lord in prayer, while not really saying all that much about being a “leader”. There’s a good reason for that, but these Christian powerDudes are all about “authority” & “leadership” & “influence”, and “acquiring & maintaining” more sycophants who do the same.

    Start with being a *servant* who *relies* on the Lord in prayer first, then get back to us, Mr. Dever.

    Fail.

    I shudder to think that people read this self-help stuff and think it’s biblical leadership.
    Where’s the discernment?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Also, here are all the place where Mr. Dever uses the word “love”.

    I’ll leave you to examine and determine for yourselves the context of these, and whether he’s talking about loving others in terms of lording it over others, or about being loved, or whatever.

    “…not a lover of money…” (bible quote)

    “But I do think it’s a property of love: love believes all things and hopes all things (1 Cor. 13:7) You probably have members of your church whom the Lord has entrusted with great talent. But for that to be discovered, someone must advance trust to them, like credit. And good leaders do this.”

    “He may scratch the floors or damage some furniture, but if you’re patient with him, you’ll have a lion who loves you for life.”

    “Satan’s basic lie to Adam and Eve was that God couldn’t really love them and tell them no. The true nature of authority became clear to me years ago…”

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Pingback: A Closer Look at Scott Sterner from Acts 29’s The Vine Church in Madison, Wisconsin; Is Scott Tilting the Forest Lakes District Toward Neo-Calvinism as the Forest Lakes Director of Church Multiplication? | Wondering Eagle

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